Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

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Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by cottmiler on Sat Sep 02, 2017 1:52 pm

I just had to retrieve this from the SwimSmooth Forum which I posted on thread "Pressing your Buoy", 19/9/15.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=35pVR7hUWXw

This was a pivotal moment for me and in view of the fact that I am now advising Bregor, Dinner Plate Paddle Man and Silver Cap at my local pool, I thought it might be useful here.

Basically, I am saying to them that there is no point in applying power and thrust with the hand/arm unless you have your horizontal floating position in place and can maintain it throughout the stroke cycle.

Every millimeter higher you can get the legs, the lower the drag for more speed and less effort.




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Re: Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by cottmiler on Tue Sep 05, 2017 8:44 am

When smootharnie asked me how to do this I said I didn't really know but it just happened.

Recently I spotted this by Coach BobM from Total Immersion:

"If you find your hips sinking on core balance, try bringing the shoulder of your upper arm forward (i.e., toward your head) and move your lower shoulder back (i.e., away from your head)."

This is rather illuminating and it works! The action of leading recovery with the elbow with normal swimming, presumably has the same effect of improving body position.




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Re: Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by nightcrawler on Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:13 am

regardless of pressing the buoy down you can also get a better floating position by extending the arm further (and opening my arm pit more), this will provide a better streamline position than pressing the buoy down. On the other hand, pressing the buoy is not always good, it can create frontal drag due to head's, chest's and shoulders' friction.

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Re: Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by Don Wright on Thu Sep 07, 2017 10:54 am

cottmiler wrote:I just had to retrieve this from the SwimSmooth Forum which I posted on thread  "Pressing your Buoy", 19/9/15.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=35pVR7hUWXw

This was a pivotal moment for me and in view of the fact that I am now advising Bregor, Dinner Plate Paddle Man and Silver Cap at my local pool, I thought it might be useful here.

Basically, I am saying to them that there is no point in applying power and thrust with the hand/arm unless you have your horizontal floating position in place and can maintain it throughout the stroke cycle.

Every millimeter higher you can get the legs, the lower the drag for more speed and less effort.



IMO a very bad example "cott..." - why was the demo chap flutter kicking while his lead arm was at a crazily low angle below the surface?  His legs were just causing him to push a wedge of water forwards!

In any case, I thought the purpose of "Pressing the buoy" while swimming FS, was to produce a transient upward lift to the hips/legs during the stroke cycle by, doing a brief head nod downwards at the appropriate time.  The most important time for doing it, is I think on the start of the inhalation arm stroke  - the "transient" effect is sufficient to last for that inhalation stroke making it easier to clear the mouth above the water line (due to the resultant "bobbing-up" effect of pushing the "T" down). The body will revert to it's former position to some degree, for the rest of the stroke cycle - but IMO, not quick enough to cause a marked deterioration in balance for the remaining part of the cycle (i.e. it is definitely not necessary to do it for the arm stroke on the non-breathing side, unless one is doing 3 arm stroke bilateral breathing possibly).

As "n...c..." points out, it introduces unwelcome drag - so one wouldn't want to do the "trick" unnecessarily!

Comparison with other strokes can give some further insight - in fly stroke for instance.  Shortly after water entry of the arms, the head is pushed down below the under-surface of the upper arms ("Pressing the buoy" again!)  for the primary purpose of initiating an upward undulation (but also, helps raise the hips, which sink as the undulation proceeds, ending with the feet higher than the rest of the body). At that stage in the fly stroke cycle, "inhalation" is not an issue, since that comes later during the major kick downbeat.


Last edited by Don Wright on Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:25 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by cottmiler on Thu Sep 07, 2017 11:08 am

Don't let Terry Laughlin hear you say that!

It's the Total Immersion Skate Drill:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Swp1cWO7mCA

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Re: Side Float/Pressing your Buoy

Post by Don Wright on Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:38 pm

cottmiler wrote:Don't let Terry Laughlin hear you say that!

It's the Total Immersion Skate Drill:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Swp1cWO7mCA
 

Yup! I know that, 'cos I was curious enough to get the TI DVD "Easy Freestyle" (sub-titled "21st Century Techniques for Beginners to Advanced Swimmers").  Can't say that I learnt anything useful from it!!!

This business of "pushing a wedge of water forwards by inappropriate lead arm action" seems to be largely ignored, (except for the SS idea that it "puts the brakes on" if there is a lead "swan  arm"), despite having an enormous impact on stream-lining!

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