Swimming problem issue

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Post by NickyMorgan on Sat Jul 06, 2019 7:08 pm

Hello guys,
I recently join this forum. I found this forum very helpful to know many things about swimming. Recently i start learning how to swim. Still suffering from some issues. Sometime felt breathing problem and sometime I got scared if water get into my ear. Is there anybody can suggest some product or some way to protect my ear?
Thank you.

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Post by cottmiler on Sun Jul 07, 2019 9:47 am

The important thing is to shake out any water in your ears after a swim. If you leave water in there your ears can get an infection which is painful.

A good product to use is Earol which is a spray olive oil.

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Post by Don Wright on Sun Jul 07, 2019 10:22 am

I just don't like water swishing in/out of my ears when freestyling, rolling from one side to the other - so I always use earplugs now (occasional bouts of "swimmer's ear" in the past were not pleasant, and soggy ear wax swells, causing a bit of discomfort or ear ache). I prefer the Zoggs soft silicone type, that come in a little convenient plastic container.  They are quite effective - but watch out that vigorous head movement (e.g. in quick snatched inhalation) with the consequent rush of water when trying to go faster (What me do that!? Laughing ) doesn't dislodge them! Over the years I've lost several of them - swished out, so always keep spares handy in my wet bag by the poolside. The Zoggs ones are unique for left/right ears - so on the rare occasions I lose one - just forget the remaining one and start a new pair - they are inexpensive!

One of my FS "variants" in particular, is a prime source for ear plug displacement - and that is when I recover my arm on the inhalation side, throwing it towards water entry and simultaneously vigorously swivel the hip down a bit on that same side.  The water meets the ear plug on the arm's water entry side, quite strongly due to the quick hip action!

On the business of other swim accessories - NOSE CLIPS and GOGGLES : -

As a "newbie" if you don't mind having water up the nostrils then that's great - it can always be snorted out!  However, as one who used to suffer from a lot of trouble with sinusitis and rhinitis, I prefer to inhale/exhale through the mouth only and use a nose clip (Zoggs again - the curved bit, above the little silicone pads, goes upwards towards the brow - not hanging down above the lips as I saw one chap doing!  Smile ) - they are not 100% effective, but are reasonably so! When to switching from lengths of freestyle to swim a bit of backstroke, you may need to remove the clip to snort out any water that is in the nostrils, before replacing the clip!

 After many years of using different sorts of goggles I've settled on the "mask" type ones (you don't get "Panda eyes" when the googles are removed, and they feel more "comfy" around the eyes). They have a firm plastic portion connecting the contiguous lenses and a silicone "skirt" of perhaps 1/2"-3/4" around the lens/nose areas (press your fingers around that "skirt" to make sure it's a close fit before getting in the water). The silicone "skirt" covers the nose bridge, eyebrows and cheek bones (am currently using "Cressi" goggles - but that firm may have gone out of business now.) With those I've found it better not to pull the head strap tight on initial use, but reduce that if there is any leakage, to make the fit tighter.  

"Fog buster" for goggles?  I reckon "Hilco" spray is the best (can order from www.hilcovision.com), just wipe the lenses dry with soft tissue after a squirt of spray to the inner side of the lenses, prior to each swim. I do not recommend the Zoggs stuff that you apply as if painting it onto the lenses, with a sponge-tipped pen - there were chemical problems with that at one time, and it does not give a smooth dry finish, you can see the dried "sponge brush" marks!

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Post by Mike A on Mon Jul 08, 2019 3:47 pm

I always swim with noseclip and earplugs now, having had a lot of problems with sinus irritation and something called eustachian tube dysfunction. It took a few weeks to get used to - at first it felt very claustrophobic! But after that it became second nature.
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Post by ramakant2k on Fri Jul 12, 2019 8:42 pm

I am new to swimming too. Been doing it for exactly one month, an hour everyday.    Signed up for a training class but they were more focused on competitive swimmers and me being 40 there is little hope for me.

They didn't feel that breathing was important. Apparently they don't feel it's necessary to breathe for short distances in freestyle. So I am learning it on my own. Good thing is the trainers leave you alone if you don't bother then with questions.

I am forcing myself to breathe out the nose all the time. That way water won't get in. I thought about using a nose clip but then what if you lose it in the pool? So I feel that breathing out the nose is the best for me. Since I am new to this I might as well learn the nose thing.

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Post by cottmiler on Sat Jul 13, 2019 9:09 am

It is great to hear from you both, NickyMorgan and ramakant2k!

We look forward to hearing your progress and hope we can help.

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Post by Don Wright on Sun Jul 14, 2019 10:44 am

ramakant2k wrote:I am new to swimming too. Been doing it for exactly one month, an hour everyday.    Signed up for a training class but they were more focused on competitive swimmers and me being 40 there is little hope for me. [if you are still breathing - then there is still hope! Smile ]
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They didn't feel that breathing was important [ Oh my giddy aunt!!!  Rolling Eyes ]. Apparently they don't feel it's necessary to breathe for short distances in freestyle. So I am learning it on my own. Good thing is the trainers leave you alone if you don't bother then with questions.

I am forcing myself to breathe out the nose all the time. That way water won't get in. I thought about using a nose clip but then what if you lose it in the pool? [a rare occurrence - just keep a spare one handy!] So I feel that breathing out the nose is the best for me. Since I am new to this I might as well learn the nose thing.


I learnt to swim "almost by accident" (some 60 years ago) after being left by "friends" (who had "given up" on me as a hopeless case, and gone off to swim around properly) - but they had left me floating on my back in shallow water.  Eureka! - I discovered that moving my arms and legs produced propulsion - then I was "off" to learning properly!  IMO learning to float is a vital confidence booster for any beginner!

 But as the ability to float depends on one's buoyancy, IMO that should be checked first, by hanging on to the pool wall in water at least 12" deeper than one's height, and by trying a "do-nothing" vertical float with lungs full, bringing the arms to the sides, with the head looking up towards the pool ceiling, legs just hanging downwards inactive. For bods with normal buoyancy, the face should just break the surface allowing for a quick snatched inhalation! (Muggins is unfortunate in not having sufficient buoyancy for that test, there are a few inches of water above my head when looking upwards.).  Older "newbies" are likely to have lower buoyancy than younger bods - the lungs are not so effective as one ages! So that means they will probably have the "sinky legs syndrome" (dragging the legs along) when swimming front crawl (aka freestyle or just "FS" on this forum) - but happily there are ways to counteract that, to ensure one can inhale OK and get the legs up near the surface for the major part of each stroke cycle.  This requires the swimmer to "press the buoy", or push down  (nod!) the head for an instant, at the start of each "inhalation arm stroke". That has the effect of pushing one's centre-of-buoyancy a bit lower and getting a buoyant reaction (like that of pushing a balloon down in the water - it bobs up quickly!

It is good IMO to initially test one's ability to float with lungs full  : -

(1) doing a Mushroom float in a "bent-over" attitude with head, arms, legs inactive hanging down to the bottom, and the back breaking the surface - giving the appearance of a mushroom!

(2) On the back with arms outstretched and leaning back in shallow water, and feet possibly on pool bottom.  By bending the wrists so that the hands break the surface, they should act as a counter-balance for the legs (IMO any part of the body not immersed has a preponderant effect on balance!), and the legs should (normally!) rise slowly upwards to the surface.

(3)  On the tum arms outstretched (with head under water for a few secs), arms outstretched and wrists bent back so the fingers poke out of the water - acting as a little counter-balance for the legs.

 When young school kids had instruction classes at the pool - I used to watch in amazement how the teachers just expected the "newbie" kids to "take to the water" by immediately thrashing their arms and legs around. No! - floating first gives beginners confidence that they wont sink to the bottom!

There are thankfully very, very few bods who have negative buoyancy, and flutter to the bottom like an autumn leaf unless they make propulsive movements with arms/legs! I have only ever read of one such person, and despite such a drawback, he did manage to enjoy swimming FS!

Personally for a "newbie" FS swimmer, I would recommend doing an inhalation on every 4th arm stroke, exhaling slowly until one is about to start the 4th inhalation arm stroke.  One can really "press the buoy" during the 3 slow exhalation arm strokes - and consequently benefit from a better horizontal attitude, and moreover, concentrate on doing the arm action properly!

Just remember to do the body roll properly as well - roll towards the stroking arm going down into the water, and roll away from that arm as it comes up to the surface.

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Post by Don Wright Yesterday at 10:13 am

A bit more on that buoyancy issue I wrote about on the previous post : -

Don Wright wrote:...the ability to float depends on one's buoyancy, IMO that should be checked first, by hanging on to the pool wall in water at least 12" deeper than one's height, and by trying a "do-nothing" vertical float with lungs full, bringing the arms to the sides, with the head looking up towards the pool ceiling, legs just hanging downwards inactive. For bods with normal buoyancy, the face should just break the surface allowing for a quick snatched inhalation! (Muggins is unfortunate in not having sufficient buoyancy for that test, there are a few inches of water above my head when looking upwards.).  Older "newbies" are likely to have lower buoyancy than younger bods - the lungs are not so effective as one ages! So that means they will probably have the "sinky legs syndrome" (dragging the legs along) when swimming front crawl  

Was not feeling all that well during my swim yesterday, so do didn't do much - but used up some time in swimming without the buoyancy shorts I normally always wear (over my "Speedos") when swimming.  My worst surmises were realized! Twisted Evil OK so I didn't sink to the bottom (it's a just over 4ft uniform depth pool) - but for back crawl my heels soon struck the floor (sinky legs for sure!) - FS was a bit of a struggle - lying low in the water, so more difficult for inhalation, flutter-kicking more actively to prevent the toes touching the bottom  Embarassed , and much harder on the arms in pulling myself along, due to the drag caused by low-lying legs - an attempt at a non-breathing fly stroke was hopeless, couldn't get my arms out of the water for recovery - one-arm fly was still feasible though, making sure the feet broke the surface at the end of the major kick upbeat.

That experience showed up the demarcation that exists between enjoyment (when helped by wearing B.S.), and sheer disappointment (without the B.S. aiding the buoyancy)!

I mentioned this to an acquaintance in the pool at the time, referring to unfortunate bods who have negative buoyancy, and just sink to the bottom unless they make propulsive movements with arms and legs.  I had a chuckle when he said such bods have a large amount of muscle mass - definitely not so in my case! Laughing


I now get my B.S. (they show a lot of wear and split a bit at the crotch after a year or so of use) from the "MyTriathlon" website  ("Zone 3" brand, about £45 I think).  I did before that, get some slightly cheaper ones from "Wiggle" but was not impressed by the quality. Could they have been "cheaty look-alikes"? - they had little circular patches like those used in repairing cycle tyre punctures over the weak points of seam joins.  The ones I bought from "MyTriathlon" didn't have such dubious patches, and were obviously of better quality.

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